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55 Rescue Dog
02-06-2017, 03:49 PM
I'll throw this one out I just freshened up. Easy to make bench vise soft jaws. Just take some scrap 1 inch aluminum angle, by 1/16 thick, cut to length, formed to top of vise, then just duct tape it. Works so much better for gripping almost anything without damage, than the steel jaws, and if you need the steel jaws, just flip them back, or peel them off if you need to heat/bend something. They last for years, and cost almost nothing!688468856886

55 Rescue Dog
02-06-2017, 04:30 PM
Another vise tip. When bolting down your vise, make sure the fixed jaw is in front of the edge of the bench so you can clamp something long. I've seen it done wrong many times. 6888

Rick_L
02-06-2017, 08:11 PM
Duct tape on the aluminum jaws just gets in the way when you want to use the originals, and the adhesive makes a mess.

55 Rescue Dog
02-07-2017, 05:26 AM
Duct tape on the aluminum jaws just gets in the way when you want to use the originals, and the adhesive makes a mess.
Thanks for that useful tip.

chevynut
02-07-2017, 08:48 AM
What else do you expect, RD? ;)

If you're making something out of aluminum and need to sand it, get some beeswax and put it on your sanding or cutting discs. I use bowstring wax in a small tube that costs about $3 and goes a long ways. I just hit the tube with the rotating disc. WD40 works but it's messier and the beeswax lasts longer. You'll be amazed at how much better the cutting action is.

http://static.shoplightspeed.com/shops/602524/files/000463794/700x700x2/bohning-bohning-tex-tite-bowstring-wax.jpg

MP&C
02-08-2017, 06:01 AM
This one is borrowed from Laszlo,

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y167/rmccartney/1955%20Chevy%20Wagon%20Restoration%20Album%204/Picture1127.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y167/rmccartney/1955%20Chevy%20Wagon%20Restoration%20Album%204/Picture1128.jpg

This helps to keep the door flush, just don't push hard on the sanding block. Let the paper do the work.. If it needs additional stability, grab the rear door and b pillar in one hand, sand with the other..

55 Rescue Dog
02-09-2017, 11:17 AM
Whenever you need to disconnect a brake line it usually makes a mess, empties out the lines and the master cylinder which makes bleeding more difficult.
Simply use a prop rod to depress the brake pedal part way, which blocks off the outlet ports inside the cylinder. Then all the fluid is stays in the reservoir and lines down stream. Like filling up a drinking straw with water, and it stays in the straw when you block one end with your finger. 6898

55 Rescue Dog
02-10-2017, 02:59 PM
If you need to mark round tubing, a stainless hose clamp works great. You can make pie-cut marks to alter the radius, or a single cut to change directions, and it helps keep the tubing cut round.
6899

Troy
02-10-2017, 03:49 PM
If you need to mark round tubing, a stainless hose clamp works great. You can make pie-cut marks to alter the radius, or a single cut to change directions, and it helps keep the tubing cut round.
6899

You can also use hose clamps with holes punched through the band to clamp tube joints together then tack the tubes together through the punched holes.

55 Rescue Dog
02-11-2017, 04:08 PM
While my wife was gone for the afternoon, I thought I would try her Roomba robot vacuum out in the garage I had just swept. I couldn't believe how much it sucked up I couldn't see. Mostly dog hair. Even goes under the car that's hard to clean. Emptied out a full bin 4 times on one charge. I just need to wipe it down, and get it back in the house before she gets home. 6904

Rick_L
02-11-2017, 06:08 PM
I should have offered an alternative to the duct tape on the vise jaws.

If you're going to bend up some jaw protectors, add a tab that can be bent down to hold them in place. If you're clever enough and the vise shape allows it, make the tab make a snap fit, not requiring it to be bent each time.

There are also some reasonably priced jaw protectors out there that fit and close down on a hex shape, great for AN hose fittings.

markm
02-11-2017, 06:38 PM
Rick Speedway has magnetic backed alum jaws very reasonable price.

Rick_L
02-11-2017, 07:10 PM
Good call, are they the ones that can correctly hold the hex shapes too?

Custer55
02-11-2017, 09:56 PM
You could also use the thin business card size refrigeratormagnets glued to the home made jaw protectors. They are easy to cut to size with a scissors.
Brian

Belair-o
02-12-2017, 07:21 AM
You could also use the thin business card size refrigeratormagnets glued to the home made jaw protectors. They are easy to cut to size with a scissors.
Brian

Brian, Great idea - I had picked up a 1/8" aluminum angle piece from Home Depot, and was about to drill holes to epoxy super magnets into to hold the pieces on the vice, but you saved me from that unnecessary effort. Thanks!

55 Rescue Dog, thanks for the great idea of the jaw liners. I have previously imprinted the waffle pattern from my vice jaw faces into pieces I clamped in the vice. I never stopped to think of a fix, just filed the pattern off. Thanks! Doug

55 Rescue Dog
02-13-2017, 01:06 PM
I remember when a great tuning mechanic I took a class from 35 years ago (1982) in the dawn age of computer controlled engines, always recommended a carbon monoxide detector in a shop. He even had a SUN chassis dyno way back then, to search for power. Finally dawned on me when I was changing the battery in the CO/explosive gas detector from the house. So, I bought a fresh new one for the house, and put this one in the garage. You just never know how long you can run a car inside even for a couple minutes with the doors open. Especially a carbureted non-emission/no cat engine running on 110 octane race gas.
6905

55 Rescue Dog
02-13-2017, 05:51 PM
I've forgot more things than I can remember! So, I'll just try and keep posting some past things I remember good or bad, to keep it going so I won't forget myself. And, why not try to "Pay it Forward"? Ideas are best when shared.

55 Rescue Dog
02-15-2017, 06:09 PM
I don't plan to ever have to drive an oil pump pick-up in a old Chevy engine again, since I've been converted to LSx engines, but I came up with a great way to drive a press fit oil pump pick-up in. In my case I had a pump pick-up with a 5/8 tube. So I took an extra 5/8 wrench with a small dimple drilled into it to hold the tip a $19 air chisel. Using just enough pressure from a regulator, and a couple index marks I easily buzzed it right very tightly in to where it needed to be.6943

BamaNomad
02-15-2017, 08:08 PM
Did you braize that pickup tube to the pump plate also?? I've heard of them falling out and starving an engine unless you do so...

55 Rescue Dog
02-16-2017, 04:42 AM
Did you braize that pickup tube to the pump plate also?? I've heard of them falling out and starving an engine unless you do so...
It pressed in straight, nice and tight, so I wasn't worried about it moving or falling out. The originals where always just a press fit. I think you can have issues by trying to beat a pick-up in with a hammer like the first one I ever did in 1973 on a BBC. That one definitely needed to be brazed.

Bihili
02-16-2017, 09:43 AM
So, I bought a fresh new one for the house, and put this one in the garage.


I did the same thing and I am amazed how often the detector goes off.
Even when I start the newer cars, if the garage door is closed the detector will go off.
So now I always open the garage door before I start my vehicle.
When I start the 57 I need two doors open.:eek:

Brent's 57
02-16-2017, 02:28 PM
Your not to put a carbon monoxide detector in a garage or by a stove, furnace or any gas appliance. Read the instruction manual, place the alarm at least 15 feet away from fuel-burning appliances. Other wise you will get false alarms. Put alarm in bedroom above or next to the garage, and hallway connected to garage. Most Carbon Monoxide detectors are good for 5-7 years and should be replaced after that time frame or when End-of-Life warning starts beeping twice every 30 seconds. Typically, the units have a tag or date stamp on the back to indicate it's age or expiration date.

55 Rescue Dog
02-16-2017, 03:38 PM
Your not to put a carbon monoxide detector in a garage or by a stove, furnace or any gas appliance. Read the instruction manual, place the alarm at least 15 feet away from fuel-burning appliances. Other wise you will get false alarms. Put alarm in bedroom above or next to the garage, and hallway connected to garage. Most Carbon Monoxide detectors are good for 5-7 years and should be replaced after that time frame or when End-of-Life warning starts beeping twice every 30 seconds. Typically, the units have a tag or date stamp on the back to indicate it's age or expiration date.
What you said is correct, but putting an extra one in a shop is still good idea. It not exactly a false alarm in a garage. It is telling you to get the hell out of there before you hit the floor. Carbon Monoxide is odorless and there is no way to guess when it might be a problem.

Rick_L
02-16-2017, 05:28 PM
I would have thought everyone that's interested in cars would know you don't start one in a closed building. You shouldn't need a CO detector if you know this.

BamaNomad
02-16-2017, 07:33 PM
What you said is correct, but putting an extra one in a shop is still good idea. It not exactly a false alarm in a garage. It is telling you to get the hell out of there before you hit the floor. Carbon Monoxide is odorless and there is no way to guess when it might be a problem.

If you are running your engine in a garage - closed or not - (without pipes carrying the exhaust outside), then it IS a problem... (I don't need a CO detector to tell me this!).. :)

55 Rescue Dog
02-17-2017, 01:42 PM
I would have thought everyone that's interested in cars would know you don't start one in a closed building. You shouldn't need a CO detector if you know this.
If someone was stupid enough to run car in a closed building they probably wouldn't have a detector anyway. Unless you push your car outside and close the door so the CO doesn't drift back when you start it, there is no other way to know is all. Just thought it would be worth a try to use the non expired one I had in the house the last 3-4 years and get a new in there which is even more important. Do you have one in your house, and a half dozen fire extinguishers around? I have 4 within easy reach just in the garage, 3 in the house, and one in the car. But if you are very careful, you probably would never need one of those either, but that isn't being careful.

55 Rescue Dog
02-22-2017, 09:18 AM
Here is a great tool for taking U-joints apart. Since I don't have a drive shaft to set up in the press for a pic, I'll try to describe. This was a loose copy from a GM service manual for a U-joint tool. I used to struggle trying to press both trunnion caps at the same time to get the first cap out. So, I took some scrap 1/4 and 3/8 steel for the top, and welded it, and ground a couple notches. It straddles the cross arms of the joint, so you can press out one cap a time. Takes HALF the force with this method, reducing the chance of bending the ears on the drive shaft. After you get the U-joint fully assembled with the snap rings the conventional way, you can use this tool to seat the caps on the retaining rings to eliminate any bind in the joint.
6952

markm
02-22-2017, 01:49 PM
Good call, are they the ones that can correctly hold the hex shapes too?

Speedway part #6173661

Info

These soft-jaw vice inserts will keep your AN fittings looking great during and after assembly. The aluminum insert firmly holds the hex portion of the fitting without marring the anodized or plated finish. They can be used with any size AN fittings from AN3 to AN32.

As a bonus, the long horizontal pockets in the inserts will hold braided hose while cutting. Includes magnet to affix it to steel vice jaws.

55 Rescue Dog
04-23-2017, 08:55 AM
I remember when a great tuning mechanic I took a class from 35 years ago (1982) in the dawn age of computer controlled engines, always recommended a carbon monoxide detector in a shop. He even had a SUN chassis dyno way back then, to search for power. Finally dawned on me when I was changing the battery in the CO/explosive gas detector from the house. So, I bought a fresh new one for the house, and put this one in the garage. You just never know how long you can run a car inside even for a couple minutes with the doors open. Especially a carbureted non-emission/no cat engine running on 110 octane race gas.
6905
Fired up my car after a long winter and in the 20 seconds it took to back out of the garage the CO detector had climbed to 100ppm. Dropped to 35ppm by the time I got a pic. Although not a dangerous short term level, it at least gives me a quick reference for staying out of the shop until it's back to zero. A cold engine puts out 70,000ppm's of carbon monoxide during the first minute of run time. 7112

55 Rescue Dog
07-11-2017, 09:29 AM
Although it has many uses, vinegar makes a safe, cheap easy rust remover. Had 4 very rusty rotors to try and clean up so I bought 3 gallons of vinegar for $6 plus added 2 gallons of water to a plastic tub big enough for 2 rotors at a time. Let them sit outside for 2-3 days with a lid on the tub. Rinsed them off with soapy water and a scotch bright. Then I just hit them with a wire wheel, and got some paint on them right after I took pics.750175027503

BamaNomad
07-17-2017, 08:55 AM
Good tip RD! How long does the vinegar/water mix *last*.. when exposed to sun/weather??

55 Rescue Dog
07-17-2017, 11:50 AM
Good tip RD! How long does the vinegar/water mix *last*.. when exposed to sun/weather??
I kept a lid on it in the shade, but it got pretty nasty after de-rusting 4 rotors 2 at a time over 5 days, and threw it out. It worked a little faster when it was fresh on the first 2 rotors. One tip, don't spill any of it on your concrete.

chevynut
07-17-2017, 12:33 PM
What works great for de-rusting is phosphoric acid which is what's in most metal prep solutions. Muriatic acid is cheap and it works, but it leaves some rust as it dries (even after good rinsing) where phosphoric doesn't. A lot of guys used to use "milkstone rinse" (phosphoric acid) that you can get from Tractor Supply. However, they have to have it in the store and they won't ship it in for you. My local stores don't have it and for some stupid reason they won't get it for me. They act like their hands are tied.

chevynut
07-17-2017, 12:36 PM
I just checked again and it looks like you CAN get milkstone remove online at Tractor Supply now. I really let them have it when they said they couldn't ship it to my local store, so maybe they changed their policy on it. ;) In fact, they say now that they even STOCK IT in my local store...gotta go get me some. :)

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/search/milkstone%20remover

LEE T
07-17-2017, 04:41 PM
I don't care for Milkstone myself, it doesn't offer any protection after you rinse it off---because it isn't formulated for rust removal, its for milkstone removal from a stainless steel tank. You can get Safety Klean's Prep and Etch at Home Depot for a little more than what Milkstone costs, and its for use on steel for rust removal.

chevynut
07-17-2017, 05:32 PM
I don't care for Milkstone myself, it doesn't offer any protection after you rinse it off---because it isn't formulated for rust removal, its for milkstone removal from a stainless steel tank. You can get Safety Klean's Prep and Etch at Home Depot for a little more than what Milkstone costs, and its for use on steel for rust removal.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Klean-Strip-1-gal-Phosphoric-Prep-and-Etch-GKPA30220/100406369

Have you tried milkstone rinse Lee? I remember reading a lot of guys say it works great. Any idea of the concentration of phosphoric acid in each product?

LEE T
07-17-2017, 06:25 PM
No, I have had no reason to try it, it doesn't have any rust inhibitors in it, and that's because they are not needed for removing milkstone. They don't seem to make any claims as far as removing rust, but I believe there is probably plenty enough acid to do that. Not long ago prep and etch was around $10 at home depot, they jumped to $12 and now $15.78

I like evaporust for rust removal on cast iron, and for cleaning cast alum parts. Evaporust doesn't contain any acid, so it will rinse off much easier than phosphoric acid, and that is very important to do before epoxy. It would be expensive, but you would really like the way evaporust cleans alum--just let it soak a couple days--and its safe on any metal.

55 Rescue Dog
08-02-2017, 04:54 AM
I removed all of the stickers and numbers from my Camaro for a redo on the graphics like Lightning McQueen, but some adhesive was left on the panels. Didn't really want to use any solvents on the pre-painted aluminum body panels, so I took some sticky Gorilla tape and stuck that to the glue, and after a few pulls it came off clean.

55 Rescue Dog
12-14-2017, 04:11 PM
After drilling many holes with a hole saw over the years, a good tip is to NOT use the 1/4 inch drill in the arbor especially when drilling through thin sheet metal, or aluminum if you want your hole to be the right size. Drill the 1/4 in pilot hole separately, and then use a 1/4 drill rod in the arbor. Otherwise if you leave a drill bit in the arbor the pilot hole keeps getting bigger, along with the hole saw making for a much bigger uglier hole than what you planned. Today I needed to drill a 4 inch hole in the lower corner of my steel garage door for a dust collector port. I will just connect up my 3/4 HP dust collector outside to suck fumes, whatever right outside, plus I won't have to listen to it. Now I need to figure out what to do with a barely used 4 inch hole saw I will probably not use again.
80758076

55 Rescue Dog
03-27-2018, 06:54 AM
I finally got around to welding up a lifting beam to use for incremental moves using my cherry picker. since it is something I will use many times I wanted it to be easy to setup, and not put any extra stress on the sheet metal lift point with a vertical lifting angle. Just used steel I had laying around which was mostly 1 1/4 inch stuff. Since I only have one picker, I made it to use on both the front and rear of the body to slip 4x4 wood beams under it to use my undercar lift. Had to make a couple of C shaped brackets to get around the tail pan.
85868587

55 Rescue Dog
03-27-2018, 06:58 AM
Here it is on the front. The cherry picker was my 3rd welding project way back in 1990. I took the dimensions from an OTC one at work, and used bigger/thicker steel on everything, along with a 8 ton jack instead of the usual 3 ton. Have used it many times, even lifted a 1100 pound tire machine a few times. Breaks down easy to load it in my truck too. I could have just bought one for less, but it was a good learning project, and 1 trip to ER for a piece of metal in my eye when I should have been using a face shield for grinding, instead of safety glasses.
85888589

markm
03-27-2018, 08:00 AM
RD , that is a lot like mine that I built in HS metal shop. At that time about the only game in town for a hoist was Walker and they were $800. You could buy a decent Trifive for that kind of money. Walker only sold 1500 pound long jacks over the counter, two of mu buddies bought them, I opted for a cheaper 5 ton Walker short jack and 20 years ago changed to a long 8 ton. I made a lot of Beer money loaning that thing out in the 70s.