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Thread: Nomad final assembly

  1. #301
    Registered Member 55 Rescue Dog's Avatar
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    It's amazing what they used to produce, and I wonder how they made the millions of original pieces that looked so great when they were new. Sometimes I wish there was an interesting way to coat them with something different?
    Last edited by 55 Rescue Dog; 10-10-2019 at 04:31 PM.

  2. #302
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 55 Rescue Dog View Post
    It's amazing what they used to produce, and I wonder how they made the millions of original pieces that looked so great when they were new. Sometimes I wish there was an interesting way to coat them with something different?
    I've seen them painted black to contrast with the paint on the car; it might be possible to powder coat the trim? I just remembered... Bob Chauvin (founder/owner of CARS, Inc) owned several Nomads over the years, mostly original, but he also did a red custom '55 nomad at one time with all the bright trim blacked out...
    Last edited by BamaNomad; 10-10-2019 at 07:42 PM.

  3. #303
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Nicely straightened and polished stainless looks way better than anything that came out of the factory. Just like the poor gaps and fit and finish on most of these cars as they left the factory. They looked decent from a distance but left a lot to be desired as far as details.

    This car at Goodguys Colorado had all the stainless trim and die cast moldings inside and out coated with what looked like Cerakote. It looked pretty good and was probably a lot less work and $$ than polishing and chroming everything. Of course the car was fairly heavily modified too.

    20190907_001.JPG
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  4. #304
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    It's interesting that we spend more $$ straightening/polishing stainless trim on our restorations today, than the ENTIRE car cost new in the mid-fifties! As has been said, 'the dollar ain't what it used to be'...

  5. #305
    Registered Member Belair-o's Avatar
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    FWIW:
    I had seen a tip where one attaches thin trim pieces to a board with strips of masking tape. After having a trim piece I was working on catch, and become a projectile, I tried the tape/board trick. It worked, and I had no more projectiles. It takes more time, because one can only do a section at a time, and then have to shift the tape, but I didn't have to spend the time repairing a projectile.
    Regards, Doug

  6. #306
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Doug? YOu used regular masking tape? and not duct tape? and it held the trim in place? Can you provide a little more detail... For example a long quarter piece of trim, how many piece of tape would you use? doubled or single? and how wide?

  7. #307
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belair-o View Post
    FWIW:
    I had seen a tip where one attaches thin trim pieces to a board with strips of masking tape. After having a trim piece I was working on catch, and become a projectile, I tried the tape/board trick. It worked, and I had no more projectiles. It takes more time, because one can only do a section at a time, and then have to shift the tape, but I didn't have to spend the time repairing a projectile.
    Regards, Doug
    I personally think that would be more trouble than it's worth. Seems like it would be hard to do except for straight pieces, and they're the easiest to control while buffing. I think it's more important to watch the buffing angles and make sure there's nothing for the wheel to catch on. Curved parts are the tricky ones, and you should not try to buff those crosswise at much of an angle or they will likely catch. Also, I let my glove glide on the side of the wheel to help steady the part (a tip from Rodney), and turn the part end for end when I get a ways past center. It's also a good idea to put tape on the buffer shaft and the nut holding the wheel on in case the part slips off the wheel and hits them....it's happened to me . There's a ton of ways to do this stuff...everyone has his preferences. I've found some shortcuts in doing this for a few days that work for me.
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  8. #308
    Registered Member Belair-o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaNomad View Post
    Doug? YOu used regular masking tape? and not duct tape? and it held the trim in place? Can you provide a little more detail... For example a long quarter piece of trim, how many piece of tape would you use? doubled or single? and how wide?
    Yes, I used a good quality, high bond 3M masking tape on a pine 1" board. Multiple spaced out strips of tape beyond the area being buffed, wrapped a couple of times. Your hands still can/do provide clamping force as well to help hold the trim. I used it on longer sections of side trim. I think part of the deal is that the edges that can/do catch are less accessible to the buffer wheel fibers.

  9. #309
    Registered Member WagonCrazy's Avatar
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    good advise about putting tape over the shaft & nut . I've also screwed up a piece of trim from it getting away from me, and tagging that nut as it projectiled itself across the garage!
    I need to do the tape trick on mine next.
    1957 Nomad- LS1/T56 on C4 chassis
    1959 Fleetside Apache 1/2 ton, shortbed, big window, 327ci.

  10. #310
    Registered Member Belair-o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaNomad View Post
    PS. I've heard of people who tried buffing the pieces while attached to the car, but there are issues with that as well..
    Well, I did some of the in-place polishing where it was going to be a huge job to get certain trim pieces off and on (around HT windows). I used this pneumatic polisher: https://www.amazon.com/Astro-Pneumat.../dp/B000I1FXVM , taping off areas I wanted to avoid.
    Not as good as the large, fixed buffer, and can't fix dents, but significantly improved those stainless pieces.
    Regards, Doug

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