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Thread: Pitfalls of flanged weld seams

  1. #31
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LEE T View Post
    They are both the same thickness as the original, but both are softer than the original. I can actually use my hand as a dolly for the back side and hammer on the front to work out the dents.

    I'm shrinking the panel in areas to make it look better and noticed something very strange. Some areas on the golden star don't seem to want to be shrunk with a stud gun, although the shrinking disc works good. Instead of the target area shrinking, it may be an ajacent area.

    I also bought a repro front fender for an unbelieveable price because it has a few dents, and it is also soft and very pliable.
    What do you think makes the older steel harder than the new steel? I have a hard time believing it's the composition so it must be work-hardening from cold rolling or forming. Cold rolled steel is hardened by the rolling process. Perhaps they're now annealing the steel after cold-rolling or using hot-rolled and pickled steel so it forms easier.
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  2. #32
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    Lee T, it seems to me that a softer steel is a good thing for the replacement quarter, given that it's not formed correctly, and you have to work it to get it right. You want metal that responds to the work you put in it.

    If you follow the metalshaping community, they seem to prefer "deep draw quality" steel, which I think has a bit more aluminum in it ("AK" is the designation I think). Maybe MP&C can comment on that, since he's an expert metalshaper.

    Also, looking at Cnut's links on steel composition, looks like the high strength stuff has a narrower range between yield strength and ultimate strength. If you're going to hammer/dolly, form, shrink, etc., seems like you'd want a wide range between yield strength and ultimate strength. That means you can shape it without cracking it, etc.

  3. #33
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    I don't have any idea what the difference is, but the old metal is way easier to work. This stuff doesn't seem to have much memory either.
    I don't do much metal shaping because I almost only work on tri-5s, and I have a stash of cars and parts to pick from. I would much rather repair an original panel than try to make one---but to each his own.

  4. #34
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    Lee T, a question on perspective. When you say "repair an original panel" are you talking about fixing a dent or crease by working the metal that's there, or are you talking about repairing rust damage by welding in a rust free panel cut from an original car?

    Most of us don't have access to original rust free panels for the places that typically need that sort of work.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by LEE T View Post
    I understand that a lot of cars have to use these reproductions, but its surprising to me to see repairable panels that some people cut off and replace with the reproductions available today.

    I remember when the only thing available was a flat panel with a formed wheel opening, so these panals are way better than that.

    You can buy good sheet metal today for patches, so I don't understand why people are throwing away good repairable panels. BTW, I have used a section an old rust free rocker panel to repair the bottom of a quarter panel.

    Quote Originally Posted by LEE T View Post
    I don't do much metal shaping because I almost only work on tri-5s, and I have a stash of cars and parts to pick from. I would much rather repair an original panel than try to make one---but to each his own.
    Some metal shapers say just make a new panel, so I was giving my reason for not getting into metal shaping myself. Looking back, the last remark could have been left out.
    Last edited by LEE T; 05-19-2018 at 03:04 AM.

  6. #36
    Registered Member MP&C's Avatar
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    Cold rolled, drawing quality, deep draw. The drawing quality steels should have less carbon in the composition, are softer to better accommodate the movement needed in stampings and even hand manipulated forming.
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