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Thread: Best way to modify dash trim

  1. #1
    Registered Member ScottH's Avatar
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    Best way to modify dash trim

    Decided to add the dash trim to my 55 so I ordered a set online. I went with the option of no radio hole as the car already has a head unit installed in the dash where a stock radio would sit. I plan to cut/modify the center trim piece where the head unit is currently installed.

    My question is has anyone cut or modified dash trim b4 & what is the best way to cut it & not mess it up?

    Any info or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    I haven't done that before, but if I were to try, I can't think of any means other than to TAPE over the area you are going to cut (maybe both sides?), mark the lines you want to cut very carefully, and then use a cutoff wheel to cut it. I suspect there will be a need to 'clean up' around the cuts afterwards... before you peel off the tape.

  3. #3
    Registered Member Belair-o's Avatar
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    Following BamaNomad's lead: and maybe use a Dremel with a wee cutoff wheel? I have had some good luck in making some precision cuts using my Dremel. They sell both abrasive wheels, and toothed versions - may want to experiment with both on some scrap, and see which seems the most controllable.
    Regards, Doug

  4. #4
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    It depends on what tools you have at your disposal. I would NOT try to do it with tin snips if you want a nice clean hole for the radio. If it was me I'd use a pneumatic die grinder with a cutoff wheel since I have them. A Dremel would be a good choice if you have one or can borrow one. Since the trim piece is aluminum, use a little beeswax on the cutoff wheel and it will cut a lot better.
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

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  5. #5
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=chevynut;50004]It depends on what tools you have at your disposal. I would NOT try to do it with tin snips if you want a nice clean hole for the radio. If it was me I'd use a pneumatic die grinder with a cutoff wheel since I have them. A Dremel would be a good choice if you have one or can borrow one. Since the trim piece is aluminum, use a little beeswax on the cutoff wheel and it will cut a lot better.[/QUOTE]

    Hmmm.. we've all probably noticed taht aluminum will build up on the cutoff wheel, and I didn't know of any way to prevent it... Beeswax? Where/how do you purchase that? More info requested..

    Re the OP: Would a nibbler be a good solution (after drilling a hole of course)...??

  6. #6
    Registered Member 55 Rescue Dog's Avatar
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    Nibblers can work, but watch out using those. They can't do sharp corners, but can get you close. Hundreds of tiny moons is what they do on tight inside radiuses.

  7. #7
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaNomad View Post
    Hmmm.. we've all probably noticed taht aluminum will build up on the cutoff wheel, and I didn't know of any way to prevent it... Beeswax? Where/how do you purchase that? More info requested..
    Go to your local archery shop and get some bowstring wax...that's what I use. Walmart sometimes carries it. It makes a HUGE difference when cutting aluminum.

    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  8. #8
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Thanks Laszlo!

  9. #9
    Registered Member ScottH's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, great suggestions & info.

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