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Thread: Vortec Bypass Hose/heater hose

  1. #11
    Registered Member 55 Rescue Dog's Avatar
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    Just saw this 33 page thread from 2011 pop up all about the subject.
    https://www.trifive.com/forums/showthread.php?t=59036
    Last edited by 55 Rescue Dog; 06-12-2019 at 02:44 PM.

  2. #12
    Registered Member Tabasco's Avatar
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    Yes it is the serpentine drive with a reverse rotation pump. On the other site I was given a link to that 33 page thread. Just about everything thing was tried on that thread. I think I will go with the suggestion of putting a tee in the lower hose for the heater return hose.

    The simplest plan would be for Chevrolet to make a water pump with two holes on top for this application. That would sure help us who put new engines in old cars.

    Thanks to everyone for your replies.

  3. #13
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 55 Rescue Dog View Post
    I always thought on every small block car I've ever had, it sure looks like the coolant constantly flows through the heater core. I sure don't recall any shutoff valves to block the coolant flow. I thought they just blocked the hot air from coming in the car?
    If you actually believe that it shows again how uninformed you are about cars. Virtually EVERY car has a coolant control valve to stop coolant from flowing into the heater core. If they didn't, you'd get heat in the passenger compartment from the core, but without the blower. Vintage Air supplies a control valve and even the stock heater core from 60 years ago has a valve. How else do you control air temperature? As for the holes in the thermostat, they're not needed with a proper bypass and do cause longer warm-up time. Lots of posts on the forums about that. A tiny hole to pass air may help purge the system. Some guys actually believe that restricting coolant flow improves cooling. LOL
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  4. #14
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    CN... again you're passing along very good information using your talent and style... making the receiver feel good by being made smarter by you~ *applause* ....

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chevynut View Post
    If you actually believe that it shows again how uninformed you are about cars. Virtually EVERY car has a coolant control valve to stop coolant from flowing into the heater core. If they didn't, you'd get heat in the passenger compartment from the core, but without the blower. Vintage Air supplies a control valve and even the stock heater core from 60 years ago has a valve. How else do you control air temperature? As for the holes in the thermostat, they're not needed with a proper bypass and do cause longer warm-up time. Lots of posts on the forums about that. A tiny hole to pass air may help purge the system. Some guys actually believe that restricting coolant flow improves cooling. LOL

    I do not believe my 67 Camaro or 72 Blazer either one have a heater control valve, for that matter neither does my 74 Z28 and its a factory AC car.
    Last edited by markm; 06-14-2019 at 07:48 AM.

  6. #16
    Registered Member Tabasco's Avatar
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    Well I have bypass hose. Until this week I didn't even know I needed one. I learned a lot about vortec engines that I didn't know.

    My intake had three holes. I originally used them for a stock temp sender, an auxiliary temp sender and heater. To add the bypass I put a tee in one hole and used that for a temp sender and the bypass.

    bypass hose.jpg

    I'll run one heater hose from the intake and the return line to a connection on the lower hose.

    Now on to the next task. There are sure a lot of pieces to a '56 Chevy. They come apart a lot quicker than they go back together.

  7. #17
    Registered Member 55 Rescue Dog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chevynut View Post
    If you actually believe that it shows again how uninformed you are about cars. Virtually EVERY car has a coolant control valve to stop coolant from flowing into the heater core. If they didn't, you'd get heat in the passenger compartment from the core, but without the blower. Vintage Air supplies a control valve and even the stock heater core from 60 years ago has a valve. How else do you control air temperature? As for the holes in the thermostat, they're not needed with a proper bypass and do cause longer warm-up time. Lots of posts on the forums about that. A tiny hole to pass air may help purge the system. Some guys actually believe that restricting coolant flow improves cooling. LOL
    I will never know as much as you Anut about cars, and surely you must know there are 2 types of heating systems used on cars. Not a lot of info out there I could find on the subject but there are water valve systems, and air blend systems to control the heat. One of the advantages of the air blend system is it adds cooling capacity since the heater core is also a radiator all the time, and diverting air with blend doors to control the cabin temp. Do modern cars even use a water valve like the old cars did? I don't ever recall mentioning restricting coolant flow to improve cooling. That's what some people do when they eliminated the thermostat which I think is a bad idea. The thermostat is a restriction even when fully open, which is the reason they use restrictors to control the flow to the same flow rate, with no bypass hose required. The 3/16's inch holes are required in the thermostat on engines with no heater, and no bypass hose to circulate coolant to the cylinder heads. Otherwise the cylinder heads will overheat before the thermostat can open. The bypass holes do slow down warm up a little, but it works.
    So, I'm guessing you surely have a better explanation?
    https://www.howacarworks.com/basics/...n-systems-work
    Last edited by 55 Rescue Dog; 06-14-2019 at 06:56 AM.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 55 Rescue Dog View Post
    Just saw this 33 page thread from 2011 pop up all about the subject.
    https://www.trifive.com/forums/showthread.php?t=59036
    Talk about bogus info this thread is full of it, all SBC factory blocks I have ever seen have the bypass cast in them, the Vortech ones do not have it in w/p or cyl head.

  9. #19
    Registered Member 55 Rescue Dog's Avatar
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    On this setup with no heater or hoses, I had to use a bypass thermostat. The radiator is below the top of the engine so I needed to fill it from the T-stat housing. I didn't want to use a surge tank so I ended up using a Moroso filler neck housing with a high pressure cap, and a lower pressure cap on the radiator with an overflow tank. I can fill the whole system with no trapped air, screw the cap on and it's good to go. I can, and have drained all the coolant with petcocks on the block, and refilled without spilling a drop. BTW, do not use the Summit water pump that failed at 150 miles, or the stainless upper hose with adaptors, and worm clamps that failed at 200mi. It now has a high pressure Goodyear hose, and constant tension hose clamps. This is a street car designed to feel/look like a race car, and it does just that. Love it, or hate it, it is a freaking hoot to drive even at 55. Even though it didn't pan out, I wanted this car to look like a 55 Chevy. Only one piece of glass, no AC, with no stereo that you could even hear, no remote controls, etc. Just a simple car built from a pile of steel.
    My 1930 Model A was a lot like that, but much more scary to drive at any speed.
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    Last edited by 55 Rescue Dog; 06-14-2019 at 05:37 PM.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tabasco View Post
    Well I have bypass hose. Until this week I didn't even know I needed one. I learned a lot about vortec engines that I didn't know.

    My intake had three holes. I originally used them for a stock temp sender, an auxiliary temp sender and heater. To add the bypass I put a tee in one hole and used that for a temp sender and the bypass.

    bypass hose.jpg

    I'll run one heater hose from the intake and the return line to a connection on the lower hose.

    Now on to the next task. There are sure a lot of pieces to a '56 Chevy. They come apart a lot quicker than they go back together.
    looks like that will work in spite of all the bogus info being put out.

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