Just joined? Please introduce yourself.
Classic Edge Designs, LLC Prime Custom Cars, LLC MadMooks
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Vortec Bypass Hose/heater hose

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Registered Member Tabasco's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012

    Member #:615
    Location
    Poolville, Texas
    Posts
    236

    Vortec Bypass Hose/heater hose

    I bought a vortec crate engine complete with accessory drive and water pump. Instructions say to run a bypass hose from the water pump to intake. There is only one place to attach a hose on the water pump. If I do that where do I connect my heater hose?

    I know there are water pumps with two openings in the top for hoses. But this is the pump which Chevrolet supplies with the engine and I would like to use it and not have to buy another. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    May 2012

    Member #:625
    Posts
    2,345
    Many Chevy trucks have heater return hose piped into the radiator. The inlet to heater core comes off front or rear of intake depending on year.

  3. #3
    Registered Member Tabasco's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012

    Member #:615
    Location
    Poolville, Texas
    Posts
    236
    Thanks. After I posted the question i googled the water pump part # and found it is for a 88-95 truck. I checked my motor manual for Chevy trucks and see that what you said is true about the line going to the radiator. I don't plan on modifying my radiator. I may have to get another water pump.

    I bought this engine because it was complete from water pump to flex plate so the install would be easy. I keep running into little things that make it harder.

  4. #4
    Registered Member 55 Rescue Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015

    Member #:2775
    Posts
    990
    I was wondering why a bypass hose to the intake? That would make sense if you were not using a heater core, which wouldn't allow coolant to circulate through the block when the thermostat is closed. I would think the heater core have the same function as a bypass hose. On my 350 LT-1 I'm running a Stewart aluminum pump with no external lines, or heater, which I solved by using a bypass thermostat with bleed holes in it to circulate coolant in the engine until it warms up and opens. Also eliminates the air lock you get when filling the cooling system up. Not familiar with the Vortec engine though.

  5. #5
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016

    Member #:3217
    Location
    Rocket City, USA (Huntsville, AL area)
    Posts
    1,521
    CN... again you're passing along very good information using your talent and style... making the receiver feel good by being made smarter by you~ *applause* ....

  6. #6
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    May 2012

    Member #:625
    Posts
    2,345
    My 1972 Cheyenne Super and both my 1987 V1500 GMCs are plumbed this way so it is nothing new. My 1972 K/5 Blazer is not, might be due to no factory A/C.

  7. #7
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011

    Member #:115
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    10,159
    I think it would be pretty stupid to use the heater core for a bypass on a hot summer day, and if you drill a hole big enough in the thermostat to circulate much coolant, you might as well not have a thermostat. Both "solutions" are nonsensical and don't solve your heater problem.

    Seems like you should be able to find another port on the intake to get hot water for your heater. Also, you could splice in a "tee" into your lower radiator hose for the heater return.
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  8. #8
    Registered Member 55 Rescue Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015

    Member #:2775
    Posts
    990
    Quote Originally Posted by chevynut View Post
    I think it would be pretty stupid to use the heater core for a bypass on a hot summer day, and if you drill a hole big enough in the thermostat to circulate much coolant, you might as well not have a thermostat. Both "solutions" are nonsensical and don't solve your heater problem.

    Seems like you should be able to find another port on the intake to get hot water for your heater. Also, you could splice in a "tee" into your lower radiator hose for the heater return.
    It wasn't my idea anyway, I gathered that info from the Stewart Components site. I always thought on every small block car I've ever had, it sure looks like the coolant constantly flows through the heater core. I sure don't recall any shutoff valves to block the coolant flow. I thought they just blocked the hot air from coming in the car?
    https://www.stewartcomponents.com/in...ormation_id=11
    Last edited by 55 Rescue Dog; 06-12-2019 at 12:06 PM.

  9. #9
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011

    Member #:115
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    10,159
    Quote Originally Posted by 55 Rescue Dog View Post
    I always thought on every small block car I've ever had, it sure looks like the coolant constantly flows through the heater core. I sure don't recall any shutoff valves to block the coolant flow. I thought they just blocked the hot air from coming in the car?
    If you actually believe that it shows again how uninformed you are about cars. Virtually EVERY car has a coolant control valve to stop coolant from flowing into the heater core. If they didn't, you'd get heat in the passenger compartment from the core, but without the blower. Vintage Air supplies a control valve and even the stock heater core from 60 years ago has a valve. How else do you control air temperature? As for the holes in the thermostat, they're not needed with a proper bypass and do cause longer warm-up time. Lots of posts on the forums about that. A tiny hole to pass air may help purge the system. Some guys actually believe that restricting coolant flow improves cooling. LOL
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  10. #10
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    May 2012

    Member #:625
    Posts
    2,345
    Quote Originally Posted by chevynut View Post
    If you actually believe that it shows again how uninformed you are about cars. Virtually EVERY car has a coolant control valve to stop coolant from flowing into the heater core. If they didn't, you'd get heat in the passenger compartment from the core, but without the blower. Vintage Air supplies a control valve and even the stock heater core from 60 years ago has a valve. How else do you control air temperature? As for the holes in the thermostat, they're not needed with a proper bypass and do cause longer warm-up time. Lots of posts on the forums about that. A tiny hole to pass air may help purge the system. Some guys actually believe that restricting coolant flow improves cooling. LOL

    I do not believe my 67 Camaro or 72 Blazer either one have a heater control valve, for that matter neither does my 74 Z28 and its a factory AC car.
    Last edited by markm; 06-14-2019 at 08:48 AM.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •