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Thread: Getting Old & Eye problems

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    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Getting Old & Eye problems

    Thanks Lee... The process as you describe it makes sense. I think I follow the process OK...

    I bought the car as a painted bare body and a pile of dirty take off parts... I've got another '57 that is in primer (not painted) that I could test on (but of course each body is a little bit different. I'm trying to use the best of the two sets of parts on this car... I like to tell people that I bought a paint job and got a disassembled car with it! (It's practically impossible to get a decent paint job in my area for a decent price, and my eyes aren't good enough any more to paint since I had the 'monoscopic' cataract correction...

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    I know exactly what you mean about the cataract surgery, I have that problem with one eye, but I wouldn't let them do the other one. For close distance I would be better off with a patch over that eye.

    Its good you have extra parts, because they will all fit a little different. I have a lot of parts to swap around on my projects, and it really helps a lot.

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    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    I've worn glasses since I was 11 or 12, and when I found out about 'monoscopic' revision (cataract surgery) I elected for it because now I seldom have to wear glasses (driving at night, watching tv, or working on the computer), BUT afterwards I realized that with one eye with a near focus lens and the other with a long focus lens, I cannot *really focus* on anything (because one eye's vision is blurry at every distance). The brain makes up for it in most cases, but when attempting to really focus on a specific item I can't see the detail that I once did... eg.. I cannot 'see' when I'm painting to adjust my speed to get the coverage and 'flow' without the runs. I used to, but no more...

    If I'd really thought about the downside, I don't think I would have elected for monoscopic vision. The normal cataract surgery would replace the lens in both eyes with 'distant' vision lens, which means you can buy 'drug store' close up glasses to do the closeup things you need them for.

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    I guess I misunderstood, I didn't know what monoscopic was. I just had regular cataract surgery, but it went wrong and left that eye useless for anything, except it does help a little with peripheral vision on that side.

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    Curious about your statements about cataracts and surgery made by both of you. I'm going to need it sometime according to my eye doctor and symptoms (probably sooner than later).

    Are both of you saying that you only have cataracts in one eye? Or have you only had surgery on one eye and that the difference between your eye that had the surgery and your other eye leaves your vision difficult or compromised? Are they recommending surgery on the other eye?

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    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    As we age, the 'natural lens in our eyes hardens and gets white spots which distorts our vision, requiring a surgery to remove the natural lens and replace it with a 'plastic manmade lens'. Whereas our natural lens 'adapts' it's shape due to commands from our brains to allow us to focus on whatever we are looking at... close or far, the plastic lens replacing it only is 'focused' at a given range. Traditionally, the replacement lens is chosen to give our eyes good focus at 20 ft or so and beyond, so when we try to read after that surgery we need to wear lens which modifies our focal point to a near field (a foot or two). These 'reading glasses' can be bought at drug stores for $5 to 10 and at Walmart and dollar stores for a $1 or 2... very cheap so you could have a set of them for your different close up tasks.

    The doctors say that sooner or later, if we live long enough, almost everyone will need cataract surgery to replace the natural lens.

    In my case, my doctor told me about 'monoscopic revision' surgery, where one eye gets the far field lens and the other gets a near field lens, I chose this in spite of their concerns to eliminate or minimize my wearing of glasses - I should have thought a little more about the pros and cons first, but I didn't. So now I can drive (in daylight), and walk around and do most things without glasses (even read, but I find myself 'winking' at the book at times). The DOWNSIDE is 1) I don't have focus with both eyes on things - our brains figure out most of what we see, but where before I had great vision for very close objects, now I don't. I made a bad choice, and I would encourage anyone considering taht to reject it and do it the normal way.

    To answer another of your questions, you may initially get cataracts in one eye (first), but eventually it's most probable that both eyes will need correcting. They generally only want to do one eye at a time regardless; I had mine a few weeks apart.

    The main thing to consider is that the natural eye 'adapts' from near field to far field as you (your brain) tells it to, and the new replacement lens cannot do that... If you are having issues with cataracts, the surgery will 'clear up' your vision... and you'll be glad you had the surgery.

    Most people have to wait til the cataracts get 'bad enough' that your insurance will pay for it... you'll begin having problems driving at night (in the face of oncoming lights) well before that point.

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    I think Gary is saying that he had different lenses put in his eyes, one for distance and the other eye for close up.
    For me, I had the surgery on one eye and I'm the one in a million that has a problem with the surgery. It left that eye with swelling on the inner part of the eye, and it wont go away. Its been over ten years, and I still use drops three times a day to make it so its not as blurry, so it doesn't interfere too much with the other eye.

    They have wanted to do the other eye this whole time, but I won't let them.

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    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Yes, Lee that is what I used so many words to say! (I've never been accused of being 'terse'!~)..

    My neighbor who is 80 just had the surgery (both eyes over a few weeks). One eye is fine, while the other had similar issues *I think* to yours. He went back and they reoperated (re stitched where they cut the lens pocket open) twice, the last time with a different doctor who specializes in that sort of surgery. They are telling him it will take a few weeks to clear up and his vision to improve.

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    Sorry about that, I was writing when you posted and didn't see it.
    I also had a second surgery but it didn't help much. Its done by a specialist that deals with the inner part of the eye.

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    Thanks for your responses.

    A friend had cataract surgery last year. He had complications, including infection and a lot of redness/irritation in one eye. He had another procedure done and it cleared all that up. He said they told him there was debris left from the cataracts which had to be removed. Later on he had the other eye done with no problems.

    I don't know how this relates, but another friend has worn a contact lens in one eye for decades and he claims he sees well.

    Another friend had both eyes done in just the last two weeks and says he's doing great.

    Thing is I don't know what either one chose for a lens, or what their vision problems and corrections were prior to cataracts.

    Myself, I've been nearsighted since the 4th grade and have been using blended trifocals for 20 years. I also have astigmatism which from my research might affect what replacement lens I will need.

    Just trying to be informed and knowing to ask the right questions when this becomes closer to reality.
    Last edited by Rick_L; 08-04-2019 at 07:27 PM.

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