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Thread: Quick Jack

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by scorpion1110 View Post
    I have a 4-post. When I did the addition to my garage I had the ceiling done with stick truss'. The height issue went away. I wanted the space that a 2-post can take away.

    Biggest nuisance is wheels off work. I have been looking at bridge jacks but the range in price from $700-$1500. I have the jack tray that came with the lift.

    How do you handle wheels off the ramps for brake work? Do you have any pictures?

    Overall I like the 4-post better than a two due to the storage capabilities, and probably need that darn bridge jack to make it easier for wheels off work.

    I use the tray and have it lined with close fitting 2x4’s for a flat surface level with the ramps so a regular small floor jack can lift the car as it sets on the 2x4’s. I also have smaller jack stands that fit nicely. Or I fit blocks between the jack arm and the axle since I’m not under the car and don’t use stands.

    The nice thing is I can lower the lift and work on the brakes sitting on a stool. I just use a two step stool to reach and refill the master cylinder. Mighty vacuum make it a one man job.

    I just can’t see how anybody would prefer on the floor with jack stands over using a lift. It is so much more convenient working standing up vs on your back on the floor. I don’t care what beer your drinking changing a transmission or starter on your back on the floor sucks.

  2. #22
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    And all that is even easier with a 2 post lift which has much less in the way.

    To me it's a floor jack and stands or go all the way to a 2 post.

  3. #23
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick_L View Post
    And all that is even easier with a 2 post lift which has much less in the way.

    To me it's a floor jack and stands or go all the way to a 2 post.
    NODS!! Yes... !

  4. #24
    Registered Member WagonCrazy's Avatar
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    To me it's a floor jack and stands or go all the way to a 2 post.
    Agreed. Unless you don't have the ceiling height. Then the quickjack is a viable option.
    1957 Nomad- LS1/T56 on C4 chassis
    1959 Fleetside Apache 1/2 ton, shortbed, big window, 327ci.

  5. #25
    Registered Member scorpion1110's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick_L View Post
    And all that is even easier with a 2 post lift which has much less in the way.

    To me it's a floor jack and stands or go all the way to a 2 post.
    Sure is but you lose side space for the lift posts, and that can be a big issue. Space is premium.

    At the end of any day, a pros and cons analysis for both types of lifts is going to yield a pretty comparable result. I did it years ago and the 4-post won.
    Scorp

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  6. #26
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    I don't get it. A 4 post has a much bigger footprint than a 2 post - even if not as wide.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick_L View Post
    And all that is even easier with a 2 post lift which has much less in the way.

    To me it's a floor jack and stands or go all the way to a 2 post.
    I don’t understand, what is in the way? The ramps are wide apart and nothing in between them. Anything can be removed/ installed: transmission, clutch, starter, brakes, brake lines, drive shaft, rear end, suspension. So easy to put car on lift and still use jack stands if you wish. There is also a center hydraulic lift option. The whole point is everything is accessed standing up and not on the ground on your back. I’ve done both ways. And there is no way it is easy to remove/install a transmission on the ground with the ease of having a car on the lift. And it don’t matter if it’s a 2 or 4 post.

    Another cool thing is a 4 post using straps is so easy to suspend below the ramps and lift off and drop the body on to the frame or on a body cradle.

    I’m not trying to change your preference but expose the plus to a lift. I just don’t see “in the way” as the full length between threads is open with the option of using the sliding tray/jack for suspending the car or even use jack stands. This works very well changing out springs and suspension.

  8. #28
    Moderator NickP's Avatar
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    Anything done on a four post can be done with a two post. Having said that, when it comes to doing tire rotations, a four post is a bit troublesome and time consuming. Doing exhaust systems on a four post can present a challenge or two. A two post will allow storage of a car above as will a four post. Without a leak free vehicle however, both will require some form of a catch basin to keep the other below free from the residue. As far as actually storing a car above, I see no real advantage because of the effort required to jockey both the top and below vehicle around. If one is doing this shop/lift thing from the start, build bigger and allow for the lift in the design if possible. If retrofitting, how often will you use it (lift)? Granted, it's like any other tool but I can justify a new 9/16 wrench quicker than a lift. Spend wisely and design for the future.

  9. #29
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    I purchased a new 4-post (Superior) about 20 yrs ago, and a 2 post about 2 yrs ago. For the first 30 yrs of my car work experience, I had no lift, except for a floor jack and jack stands. With the floor jack and jack stands, I've removed several bodys from chassis for restoration, and reinstalled them without other help. I purchased the 4-post primarily to get an extra 'garage space' - for double parking two Corvettes. The 4-post 20 yrs ago cost me twice what I paid for the 2-post 2 yrs ago. The ONLY utility I received from the 4-post was the double parking and removing/replacing cat-back exhaust on a C4 Corvette (two different times). With the two post lift, I've had the body of my '57 Nomad up and down off the original and the custom chassis probably 50 times during the build/customization process. When I'm not using the 2-post, I have a Corvette parked in the space which is easily movable for when I need the lift. The 4-post is such that I have a non-driveable '57 Nomad sitting on it without any loss of utility (since I'm only using the parking space in my garage).

    That is my experienced opinion with jack/jackstands, a 4-post, and a 2-post.

    My neighbor (a good car buddy - 80 yrs old) has a jack very similar to the quickjack, and it's mostly used for oil-changes (and that isn't easy with some cars), and for tire rotations and tire/brake work.

  10. #30
    Registered Member scorpion1110's Avatar
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    Rick-

    My shop was built as a residential extension; with additional length. I left the interior walls up and installed pocket doors to effectively do two things; retain wall space for shelving on both wall sides and be shut-off from the main garage for a light spray or a dust creating project. I had an architect come in and do drawings; the roof is done with Stick Truss' and I had extra deep footers poured at the 4 post points. Not fancy but I wanted an efficient plan that would optimize space and wanted a clear template for the builder.

    A 2-post with substantial pillars in my case would have been right where the pocket doors are. Additionally for the arm extension to place it where the 4-post ramps are, would have created a wider width footprint. The 4 posts are pulled in fairly tight.

    So in my instance, to preserve wall space, allow for a separation of the shop add on and based on my check of a friend's 2-post, the 4-post saved space and created a perceptual safety increase from a two post. I went with cut posts as opposed to welded tabs (the version originally used by the military and now by B.Y. Buddy). The horizontal dogs lock in the posts rather than rest on the tabs.

    Its a forever debate. Just like Ford vs. Chevy.
    Last edited by scorpion1110; 11-27-2019 at 12:11 PM. Reason: typomeister
    Scorp

    Rides:

    1955 Chevy 2-door Wagon
    1967 MGB GT
    1970 Honda Trail 70
    1974 Yamaha 175 Enduro
    2004 Tacoma 4x4

    I lost my best friend on 10/3/2018. Rest in Peace Dear Lucy. I miss you everyday.

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