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Thread: Things that are not right.

  1. #1
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    Things that are not right.

    I put new brakes on the rear of my Dads 1968 Mustang today, when I went to bleed them a 3/8 socket was too small and a 7/16 was too big. A 10mm fit but that is just wrong, and obviously a commie plot, the Wagner brake people will hear about this tomorrow.

  2. #2
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    American cars went metric 35-40 years ago but some guys slept through it. They should have gone HARD metric 60 years ago as it's a much simpler system. What idiot came up with "sixteenths"?

    Metric: base is meters. One nanometer is 1 billionth of a meter. One micrometer (aka micron) is 1 millionth of a meter. One millimeter is one thousandth of a meter. One Centimeter is one hundredth of a meter. One decimeter is one tenth of a meter. One decameter is 10 meters. One kilometer is 1000 meters. One megameter is 1000 meters. And so on.

    English/imperial: What's the base? Inches? Feet? 1/1000 of an inch is 1/1000th of an inch. 1/16 of an inch is 62 1/2 thousandths of an inch. 1/8 of an inch is two sixteenths of an inch or 125 thousands of an inch. 1/4 of an inch is 2/8 of an inch or 4/16 of an inch or 250 thousandths or an inch. One foot is 12 inches. One yard is 3 feet. One mile is 5280 feet. What total nonsense. Whoever came up with this shit had to be on drugs or just plain retarded.

    Similar BS with area, weight/mass, volume, force, and even temperature units. Tell me which makes more sense.
    Last edited by chevynut; 12-30-2019 at 10:40 AM.
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  3. #3
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    I'm still locked onto Fahrenheit, and Inches and always will be, right or wrong. Many times all I need are my 1 foot long shoes, which wouldn't work for me in mm.

  4. #4
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chevynut View Post
    American cars went metric 35-40 years ago but some guys slept through it. They should have gone HARD metric 60 years ago as it's a much simpler system. What idiot came up with "sixteenths"?

    Metric: base is meters. One nanometer is 1 billionth of a meter. One micrometer (aka micron) is 1 millionth of a meter. One millimeter is one thousandth of a meter. One Centimeter is one hundredth of a meter. One decimeter is one tenth of a meter. One decameter is 10 meters. One kilometer is 100 meters. One megameter is 1000 meters. And so on.

    English/imperial: What's the base? Inches? Feet? 1/1000 of an inch is 1/1000th of an inch. 1/16 of an inch is 62 1/2 thousandths of an inch. 1/8 of an inch is two sixteenths of an inch or 125 thousands of an inch. 1/4 of an inch is 2/8 of an inch or 4/16 of an inch or 250 thousandths or an inch. One foot is 12 inches. One yard is 3 feet. One mile is 5280 feet. What total nonsense. Whoever came up with this shit had to be on drugs or just plain retarded.

    Similar BS with area, weight/mass, volume, force, and even temperature units. Tell me which makes more sense.
    Well, I have to admit I stopped reading the above post when i read across where CN wrote:
    "One kilometer is 100 meters. One megameter is 1000 meters. And so on."

    Rather than correcting this.. I'm just going to ask CN.. 'Are you SURE about that'?



  5. #5
    Registered Member busterwivell's Avatar
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    I'd rather use a 7/16 socket than, say, 13mm. I hate that I have to have both sets.

  6. #6
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by busterwivell View Post
    I'd rather use a 7/16 socket than, say, 13mm. I hate that I have to have both sets.
    If your car was all-original, you would be totally 'english'/SAE .. .. but I agree with you, with the mods we do nowadays, we all need both SAE and metric tools... I resisted buying 'metric' tools for as long as I could, but now I have pretty much full sets...

  7. #7
    Moderator NickP's Avatar
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    Having worked on just about every type of automobile through my years on earth, I have become accustom to having the tools needed for the task and find no real heartache about having to do so. I also like to know what is required prior to taking on a special task and will either review my auto manuals or look it up on line, eliminating frustration and errors in judgement. As to what one prefers relative to measuring distance I am an American Citizen and until the country changes (never happen) I use what was delivered in school as a basis for that.

  8. #8
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaNomad View Post
    Well, I have to admit I stopped reading the above post when i read across where CN wrote:
    "One kilometer is 100 meters. One megameter is 1000 meters. And so on."

    Rather than correcting this.. I'm just going to ask CN.. 'Are you SURE about that'?
    Fixed. You know it was a typo. I guess you missed the whole point of the post.
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  9. #9
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NickP View Post
    Having worked on just about every type of automobile through my years on earth, I have become accustom to having the tools needed for the task and find no real heartache about having to do so. I also like to know what is required prior to taking on a special task and will either review my auto manuals or look it up on line, eliminating frustration and errors in judgement. As to what one prefers relative to measuring distance I am an American Citizen and until the country changes (never happen) I use what was delivered in school as a basis for that.
    But what's so stupid is we have to have tools that are both metric and English. If they would have changed to metric long ago, we wouldn't be doing this BS and we wouldn't have to convert our units. Our kids wouldn't know the difference and would see how utterly stupid the English system is. My daughter speaks in metric units for the most part. She's a neuroscience professor at the University of Vermont and her schooling was mostly metric as was mine. In engineering classes virtually everything is in metric units. Any engineer knows that metric makes MUCH more sense than English.

    Anyone know what a "slug" is? It's a unit of mass in the English system.

    "The slug is a derived unit of mass in a weight-based system of measures, most notably within the British Imperial measurement system and in the United States customary measures system. Systems of measure either define mass and derive a force unit or define a base force and derive a mass unit[1] (cf. poundal, a derived unit of force in a force-based system). A slug is defined as the mass that is accelerated by 1 ft/s2 when a force of one pound (lbf) is exerted on it."

    "The blob is the inch version of the slug (1 blob is equal to 1 lbf⋅s2/in, or 12 slugs)[2][9] or equivalent to 386.0886 pounds (175.1268 kg)."
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  10. #10
    Registered Member Troy's Avatar
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    In my work dealing with physicists (a lot of them foreign) they use metric units for everything. Most of my design work is done in inches, mainly because it's harder to find metric stock materials here in the US. It is getting better these days. One other thing is the equipment I have to build around is both inch and metric so I never have one system to use!!!

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