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Thread: Cribbing

  1. #11
    Registered Member Troy's Avatar
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    Hello all, my main need was to lift the car off the floor high enough to fit myself under the car and support it under all four wheels like reality. I need to make measurements like trans output angle, differential angle to make sure they are in the correct phase to eliminate or reduce vibrations. My dad built my trans cross member years ago and I don't know how he got the location. I'm installing new engine mounts and trans mount and I want it right. I also want to do work under the car prior to dropping the frame out. By the word cribbing, it's what our rigging team at work use to support things they lift and need to support https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_crib. I'm just going to make some 12" x 12" x 12" cubes out of either 2 x 4's or 4 x 4's

  2. #12
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    The stock engine angle is 4 degrees down in the rear relative the the main frame rails. If you don't have a digital level, just level the frame and measure the engine angle. The pinion should point up to the front at the same angle, under load.
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

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  3. #13
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    I'm finding my new car dollies work great for lining up body mounts, and moving it bits at a time, with the weight of the body supported barely off the frame. For a lot of other stuff I like to have the weight of the car sitting on the tires. The dollies get the car up just high enough you can slide under it. I did see a picture of a guy that made some 2x4 cribbing to fit on top of the wheel skates to get the car up a little higher. Of course they are also great for spinning your car around in the garage.
    IMG_6937.JPG
    Last edited by 55 Rescue Dog; 01-15-2020 at 04:56 PM.

  4. #14
    Registered Member Troy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chevynut View Post
    The stock engine angle is 4 degrees down in the rear relative the the main frame rails. If you don't have a digital level, just level the frame and measure the engine angle. The pinion should point up to the front at the same angle, under load.
    CN I know that angle, but I don't know if my dad did so I want to check it as well as install the new engine and trans mounts. It's going to be hard to measure the pinion angle maybe I can tie my kid under the car!!!. I was told the pinion should be ~1/2 deg down at rest. How does that sound to all. One other thing is there's a lot of work to do under the car before it's separated that's why I want the cribbing.

  5. #15
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    "As per standards published in 2003 by ASTM, an international building standards non-profit, all concrete blocks must support at least 1,700 pounds of weight per square inch (PSI). This standard only describes minimum requirements, however."

    I don't see how lateral stability is any worse than 4 jackstands. I wouldn't hesitate to use CONCRETE blocks (not cinder blocks) to support a body. They need to be used with the holes vertically oriented for strength. I'd even work under the car supported that way. No worse than jackstands.
    I was under the perhaps misguided (or perhaps not) impression that a concrete block and a cinder block are the same thing. I found that for the most part they are not. Cinder blocks are made from cement and fly ash. Concrete blocks are made from concrete - however the concrete composition can contain fly ash. And yes there's an ASTM spec for concrete blocks, but are all "concrete blocks" made to ASTM standards? I really doubt it. I did find a comment by a civil engineer saying that you should consider them the same unless it's known otherwise.

    RD's stack of blocks is about 3' to 3-1/2' high. A decent jack stand that tall is going to have a much bigger footprint than a concrete block. Looks like it would only take 10-20 pounds of side force to knock RD's stack over.

    When I was young and dumb and broke I used concrete/cinder blocks to support a car for months in my dad's garage. I worked under it a bunch. One day I was out there working on it, not underneath - barely touched the car and one of the blocks cracked and collapsed. I learned my lesson and thanked God I wasn't under the car. Of course they could have been "cinder blocks".

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    CN I know that angle, but I don't know if my dad did so I want to check it as well as install the new engine and trans mounts. It's going to be hard to measure the pinion angle maybe I can tie my kid under the car!!!. I was told the pinion should be ~1/2 deg down at rest. How does that sound to all. One other thing is there's a lot of work to do under the car before it's separated that's why I want the cribbing.
    I'm not exactly sure, but I think what I was suggesting would work with car skates. It allows you to have the car sitting on the suspension, without being bound up so you can get measurements, and still have room to get under it.

  7. #17
    Registered Member chevynut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    CN I know that angle, but I don't know if my dad did so I want to check it as well as install the new engine and trans mounts. It's going to be hard to measure the pinion angle maybe I can tie my kid under the car!!!. I was told the pinion should be ~1/2 deg down at rest. How does that sound to all. One other thing is there's a lot of work to do under the car before it's separated that's why I want the cribbing.
    So why don't you wait til the frame is out from under the car to set up the engine/tranny and the rearend? I'm not understanding why you want to do it while the frame is under the car. If you don't have any suspension control device in the rear like traction bars, 4-link, or something like that I think you need more than 1/2 degree for axle wrap. Not sure how much though. I don't have to worry about it with the C4 IRS.
    56 Nomad, Ramjet 502, Viper 6-speed T56, C4 Corvette front and rear suspension

    You can see my 56 Nomad build here http://www.picturetrail.com/chevynut

    For affordable C4 Corvette Suspension conversions for your car, visit http://www.classicedgedesigns.com

    Other vehicles:

    56 Chevy 2-door BelAir sedan
    56 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    57 Chevy 210 4-door sedan
    1961 Willys CJ3B Jeep
    2001 Porsche Boxster S
    2003 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Duramax

  8. #18
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    Not exactly off subject, but I've been waiting to see CN's finished body on the finished frame, and how he did it. What's the hold up? I would be scared too. It's much easier with an empty shell. Looked easy on the 1955 assembly line.
    Last edited by 55 Rescue Dog; 01-15-2020 at 05:46 PM.

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