Just joined? Please introduce yourself.
Classic Edge Designs, LLC Prime Custom Cars, LLC MadMooks
Page 8 of 9 FirstFirst ... 6789 LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 83

Thread: 39 Ford Project

  1. #71
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016

    Member #:3217
    Location
    Rocket City, USA (Huntsville, AL area)
    Posts
    2,260
    I like your temporary shelter also, Brian... I've thought of doing that myself (for blasting and priming) since my shop is always so full.. crammed...

  2. #72
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015

    Member #:2442
    Location
    Custer, WI
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by WagonCrazy View Post
    Lookin' good Brian. Great temporary blasting structure you built there. Get everything else off the car that needs blasting done, and then use it as a spray booth to get primer on, then dissasemble and move the party inside for the fall/winter.
    Thanks Paul, I hadn't thought about using it for doing primer but I guess I could if the weather cooperated. Main issue would be that I have no lights in there. Something to think about though.

  3. #73
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015

    Member #:2442
    Location
    Custer, WI
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by BamaNomad View Post
    I like your temporary shelter also, Brian... I've thought of doing that myself (for blasting and priming) since my shop is always so full.. crammed...
    Thanks Gary, at least I'm not the only one with too much junk and not near enough room!!!

  4. #74
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016

    Member #:3217
    Location
    Rocket City, USA (Huntsville, AL area)
    Posts
    2,260
    yes, I'm embarrassed to tell you how many 'garages' I've got with NO table space at all.

    PS. I think a section or two of clear plastic sewn (or taped?) into your tarp covering the framework would solve the lighting issue for priming, Brian... at least on nice sunny days..

  5. #75
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015

    Member #:2442
    Location
    Custer, WI
    Posts
    405

    Progress Update

    It's been a while since I last posted on here. I have been busy working on getting things in shape to get epoxy primer on all the part that I have sandblasted so far. I have been on vacation since September 10th, and will be officially retired on Monday, October 10th, So I have not been online much lately. Not sure how I got anything done while I was still working for a living.




    Here are all the parts I got sandblasted using my outdoor room which was working well to keep the mess under control.



    So then my 35 year old air compressor decided it was time to expire. The pipe from the compressor pump to the tank had blown out I think due to a dirty and stuck check valve. I had replaced the pipe and cleaned out the check valve and it was working fine again but didn't sound quite right and then it started really making bad noises and this is what I found when I took the pump apart.



    So after debating buying a new compressor or fixing this one I decided to fix what I had since the tank is still in good shape and the motor seemed fine. I got the pump from Harbor Freight since I could buy it at our local store without having to wait several days for something I would have to order. I had to weld on a new mounting plate and relocate the motor slightly and with some new airline plumbing motor pulley and belt it was about ready to go.



    Then the belt guard need to be modified to go around the bigger pulley on the pump.


    All hooked up ready to give it a try. The pump itself works great. It is rated for a 5 hp motor with a max pump rpm of 1050. My motor says its 5 hp, 230 volts and 15 amps. so I know it is not a true 5 hp so I used a 4" pulley on the motor to turn the pump at about 950 rpm figuring the motor could handle that. To try it out I did some sandblasting in my cabinet so I would be able to tell how it was doing. Unfortunately the motor overheated after about a half an hour and would not reset so I gave up for the night and looked at what a new motor would cost. The next day the motor had cooled off and reset fine so I gave it another try sandblasting and it overheated again in about a half an hour. So my last thing to try before buying a new motor was to put the original 3 1/8" motor pulley back on which would turn the pump at about 750 rpm and give it a try. So far that has been working ok but at times it seems like the motor struggles so eventually I will most likely buy a new motor for it. Then I will be able to get a bigger motor pulley that will run the pump closer to the max rpm which will be a nice upgrade on the air output.


    So when it came time to sandblast the body I decided to go to plan B and do it inside the garage for a couple of reasons. I didn't want to be running the compressor hard when I would not be able to hear it running and there was rain in the forecast at the time so I would have had to wait for better weather too. I ended up hanging plastic sheeting from the ceiling to create a sandblasting room inside the shop. It worked good to keep the media contained but the dust was pretty bad at times so I don't plan on doing that again anytime soon.


    All the blasting done but lots of cleanup to do!!

    All cleaned up and ready for a few rust repairs before getting some primer on the whole body. I didn't blast the firewall since that will be replaced eventually anyway. At the top of the picture if you look close you can see where the plastic sheeting is attached to the ceiling. I used strips of plywood, duct taped the plastic to the plywood, and then screwed the plywood and plastic up to the ceiling. To get the plastic up out of the way I used another strip of plywood to roll the plastic onto and hook it up to the ceiling. I think I may used the same method to create a temporary spray booth when I start painting parts.
    Brian

  6. #76
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016

    Member #:3217
    Location
    Rocket City, USA (Huntsville, AL area)
    Posts
    2,260
    those 39 parts are looking great Brian, and are going to look even BETTER with some epoxy primer on them and all screwed back together.. Sorry to hear about your air compressor problem...

    Speaking of 5 hp electric motors: My 50 yr old compressor (two stage IR pump, HUGE 5 hp motor, and replaced 80 gallon horiz tank). The 5 hp motor on that compressor (I think it's original) is approximately 4X larger physically than the 'so called' 5-hp electric motors that have been available the past 30 yrs or so... Makes me wonder how the ways the specs are written and tested have changed?

  7. #77
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015

    Member #:2442
    Location
    Custer, WI
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by BamaNomad View Post
    those 39 parts are looking great Brian, and are going to look even BETTER with some epoxy primer on them and all screwed back together.. Sorry to hear about your air compressor problem...

    Speaking of 5 hp electric motors: My 50 yr old compressor (two stage IR pump, HUGE 5 hp motor, and replaced 80 gallon horiz tank). The 5 hp motor on that compressor (I think it's original) is approximately 4X larger physically than the 'so called' 5-hp electric motors that have been available the past 30 yrs or so... Makes me wonder how the ways the specs are written and tested have changed?
    Thanks Gary,
    I'm not sure how they come up with the hp ratings on electric motors but mine was for sure overrated. When I was looking at replacements I think you have to look at the amps they draw at the voltage you have. Mine being 230 volts and 15 amps is more like a 3 to 4 hp motor. From what I was looking at it would need to be about 20 to 23 amps to be a true 5 hp motor.
    Someone else that knows more about how they are rated may have a better idea of what a true 5 hp motor specs would be.
    Brian

  8. #78
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015

    Member #:2442
    Location
    Custer, WI
    Posts
    405

    Progress Update


    So with all the media blasting done on the body I found some new rust areas that needed repair. The weather that week was below normal so it wasn't a good time to spray any primer anyway so I figured I might as well work on fixing some of the rust until the weather warmed up again.



    The rear inner wheel wells are pretty solid for the most part but had some small rust areas where the rear fenders bolt in and where there was inner structure that trapped moisture between the panels. Most of it was small pin holes that I could just weld shut but a few spots needed patches. The one above was a fairly small patch.



    Patch tacked in place.



    Fully welded and ground out. No need to get these perfect as they are in a position that would be pretty hard to see with the fender bolted in place and the wheel well with eventually be finished with either bedliner material or undercoating.



    The passenger side had a spot that needed a much bigger patch.



    Cut out and ready for the patch.



    Lower part of the patch tacked in place. I had intended to do the patch in one piece but after fighting with it for a while to get if fitted up I just decide to do it a half at a time.



    Top half of the patch tacked in place. I forgot to get a picture of it fully welded and ground out.



    And another small patch towards the back of the car. Below and to the left of the patch I had to cut the inner wheel well and bend it up to get at the gas tank bolts. Here is has been bent back in place and welded back together. I had to do a similar cut and and bend on the drivers side.



    And they worst of the rust was in the lower corner of the passenger side rear quarter panel.



    Rust as well as some bent metal to repair here.


  9. #79
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015

    Member #:2442
    Location
    Custer, WI
    Posts
    405


    I ended up cutting out a section to straighten it out off the car.



    With the dents straightened out so I could use what was left of it to create a patch panel.



    The first step was to make the inner flange and tack it to the original piece and add a temporary brace to locate the bumper brace opening where if belonged.



    Lower part patched and clamped in place to check the fit. This is why I have not done anything with the tail pan yet that will eventually need to be replaced. I knew I would need it to line up the patch in this corner.



    Upper area cut out to fit that area for the patch panel.


    Top part fitted and welded in place as well as a small piece to recreate the upper area of the bumper bracket opening. In all took 5 pieces including what was left of the original to create the patch. And this is just for the inside portion of what needs to be repaired.



    And finally tacked in place on the car for good. Now to cut out the rusted area on the right and make a patch panel for that side.



    Right hand side patch panel tacked in place. This was a tricky one to fit up as the area curves in 2 different opposite directions. I didn't get it perfect but it shouldn't take to much filler to make it right.



    And one last patch on the inner wheel well to tie it all together.



    Fully welded and ground out this area is in much better shape. Finally ready to start prepping the body for epoxy primer.
    Brian

  10. #80
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015

    Member #:2442
    Location
    Custer, WI
    Posts
    405
    So I have some metalwork and rust repairs left to do on the cowl area of the body but since the weather is starting to turn colder I decided to start getting primer on the body and a few other parts that are ready to go.





    The body all sanded out and ready for primer pushed outside to blow off as much dust as possible. For an area to spray the paint I used the same plastic hung from the ceiling that I had used for sandblasting and extended it out to the garage door. I did this as much to keep the paint overspray off everything else in the garage as keeping the spray area clean.



    This car has a lot of pitted areas where there was surface rust which was all sandblasted but to make sure no rust would ever come back through and to fill in some of the pits I painted those areas with a couple of coats of Tamco 5311 direct to rust high build primer then block sanded those areas before spraying the epoxy primer. The Tamco 5311 is a direct to metal high build primer that has rust encapsulating properties. You could use it to spray the whole car if you wanted. I am using epoxy over it for the long term moisture sealing qualities the epoxy has.













    With a couple of coats of epoxy on the body it looks much better. The Tamco epoxy lays down very nice even with my cheap Harbor Freight spray gun (the cheapest model the sell). I didn't spray the sides of cowl yet as I have some body work and rust repair to do in that area yet as well as a recessed firewall to install. I did not paint the frame at all at this point either as I need to prep the frame better before spraying that.




    So with the body mostly done I set up a smaller area by the garage door to spray the hood, doors and fenders.
    This way I can keep the overspray off the freshly painted body.

Page 8 of 9 FirstFirst ... 6789 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •