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Thread: wagon progress

  1. #871
    Registered Member MP&C's Avatar
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    Today we had a back up and punt moment. The nice chrome bezel on the gauges is far too large to fit in those corners of the instrument panel bezel from the outside. So we'll have to keep it on the backside, but that doesn't help us cover up the cut edge of the hole in the ribbed stainless..














    ......so let's make some stainless "eyelets" to both hold the ribbed stainless securely to the billet panel, as well as give us a finished edge around the cut hole.. First a punch and die will be needed to press one side of our eyelet.














    and we added a 1/2 x 1/2 tang to hold the punch in the press brake...
























    Back to the south bend to cut out our flange lip.. The punch was snug after the press operation, so it was used as a holding fixture for the trimming operation.














    A holesaw in the drill press started the holes for the gauges and then we used our Jigsaw with cruise control to fine tune the openings.









    A sheet of phenolic gives us a non-marring surface to pound on, the Snap-on linear stretch hammer swages the flange over and a 1/2" diameter round makes a good punch to flatten out the rest.



















    Finished "eyelets"














    Still have to install the indicator lights, but since I need to pack up for the local car show tomorrow in Leonardtown, we'll finish that up this coming week.






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    Last edited by MP&C; 04-23-2022 at 09:32 PM.
    Robert



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  2. #872
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    Really cool progress and fab work!!

  3. #873
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    Robert, your use of and manufacture of the 'eyelets' is fantastic!

  4. #874
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    Puts a whole new spin on build a car.

  5. #875
    Registered Member Custer55's Avatar
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    Awesome work Robert and it looks very nice that way. Also nice see I'm not the only one who has clamped their jig saw in a bench vice!! Tricky part is getting it clamped tight enough to stay in place with damaging the jig saw.
    Brian

  6. #876
    Registered Member Belair-o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MP&C View Post
    That was the wire being removed from the battery post.
    Ha! I missed that!

  7. #877
    Registered Member MP&C's Avatar
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    We did a test fit of the instrument panel in the car to see what it looked like with the green backdrop...









    This stainless will be the same material used in the dash insert "band" that goes from side to side, as well as the insert for the console. Should add some pizazz to the interior... Here's the view with our Alpinetech indicator lights added....









    Our OEM retainers for the bottom of the curved side glass had one piece with a bracket broken off. These brackets serve as a place to screw/attach the garnish moldings.














    The broken piece was removed and the spot welds ground smooth...









    A new piece was cut out of some 19 ga steel and the Diacro press brake made short work of repeating 45* bends.









    The new part was media blasted, TIG welder used to plug weld things back together, more media blasting and some epoxy mixed up and brushed on using an acid brush.
























    On to our glass installation, we had picked up some 3M strip-calk to seal the rubber to the glass.














    We found that the full width strip provided a bit too much and some oozage ensued... First is always the messy one, right?



















    So we laid the following ones on the glass and cut down the middle for a more narrow strip.. More better....









    So then a person gets cocky and needs a reality check on the driver's side....









    Eh, good a stopping point as any..
    Robert



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  8. #878
    Registered Member MP&C's Avatar
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    OK, long overdue for an update..


    Playing some more with our dash insert, this should look good..









    We attempted different processes for folding the hemmed edge trim, but alas none gave a good consistent finish.









    So some stainless strips were dropped off at Triton metals, a local machine shop we have used before... They will get much better results, still waiting on completion.




    Back to our problem child of a window, this crack occurred as I slightly pried rearward with a metal rule. Exactly where I pried.









    To limit the excess squeezed out of the seals on our next glass, we took the 3M strip-calk in its original form and sliced right down the middle..














    Here's a video showing installation of the strip-calk, and another with installation of the seal over the strip-calk.












    Installing window #2, we had a slight tight area and I asked Jared to push outward and that's when we had a repeat of Groundhog Day..









    So, maybe the pry the first time was not the only issue. Fast forward so we can look back, last night we did a dry fit of the garnish moldings around these windows and found that the tack strips holding the headliner were far too thick and pushed the moldings down so far that the back side would be visible through the glass. In addition, this was also pushing downward on the window and seal while we were attempting the installation. When we had installed the quarter panel previously, we used plug welds inside this window opening and some had a slight proud. Nothing that I was concerned with at the time and considering had the tack strip been the correct thickness it likely wouldn't have been an issue now. But with the headliner pushing downward, the seal was hanging up on one of the plug welds as Jared was pushing outward on the corner, which made a perfect fulcrum effect for crack #2. Since we aren't pulling a headliner out, we went ahead and cleaned up the plug welds. This meant taping off all the nice pretty paint on the outside and the interior as well..














    All of the welds cleaned up, we mixed up some SPI epoxy and used a small brush to add three coats on the bare areas. And to counter the effect of the garnish molding hanging too low, we will now need to make some one-off upper clips that are half height of the ones we just ordered (and have been waiting 4 months to arrive), in order to get the molding up and out of sight when looking through the glass. Story of my life..




    Window #3!! We had length issues from the last replacement, let's check this one as well. Hooking our tape measure on the apex of the pointy end, the original ordered with the rest of the glass set shows to be 40-1/16 in length. The new replacement, like the last one (#2), was 40-5/16. So we have a 1/4" to remove.


































    So we consulted my glass expert John Glenn the last time we did this, and got the rundown of the various methods we could possibly use. Since I'm more of a go slow and sneak up on the end goal, I opted for using Cubitron belts on our Dynabride sander. It did a better job of taking down corners so we followed the process discussed in the next video. Then when we had reached the size needed (three hours later), a 320 grit disc on the DA gave a more polished appearance.















    Our installation last night went in relatively painless and crack free. Now to make some upper clips..



    Last edited by MP&C; 06-04-2022 at 06:58 AM.
    Robert



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  9. #879
    Registered Member WagonCrazy's Avatar
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    Wow. You and your crew earned your gold stars on this one! What a PITA. Good that you stuck to it enough to figure out what was causing all the drama. Thank you for posting this Robert. I'm sure one of us will learn something here. Glad to have your input (and pics&videos).
    1957 Nomad- LS1/T56 on C4 chassis
    1959 Fleetside Apache 1/2 ton, shortbed, big window, 327ci.

  10. #880
    Registered Member MP&C's Avatar
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    Thanks, just glad to have that booger off my finger.


    Something else we did recently, a good friend of mine has a powder coat business and has been restoring a Kent model KMX850 bmx bike. The bike was found in the woods and was brought to him for repairs, with many of the obsolete parts being sourced from other style bikes and scooters. Here is where he has it thus far..









    Once the sun had taken its toll on the seat upholstery, the foam inside became a nice sponge for all the precipitation that Mother Nature could throw at it, leaving much of the seat pan gone. So he needed a seat pan fabricated, and this is where I entered the picture..









    His major concern was that we duplicate the impaling spikes to secure the upholstery.









    I had attended an estate sale about a year ago and picked up a set of Malco notchers, not knowing what I'd ever need them for, but also knowing I couldn't do without them.



















    So when I pulled these out of the tool box all fears had been abated..




    We started with a piece of 19 gauge AKDQ and used Stan Fulton beading dies to add the center bead.














    A piece of 5/8 round stock on the magnetic brake then added the radius for the side bends. Some of the 5/8 round stock was also used to make some post dollies with a welded stop for use in the bench vise..









    Basic shape









    The Erco kick stretcher used on the sides and the post dollies on manipulating the radius bend helped to provide the kickup needed at the rear.









    A solid rod across the rear mounting holes gives us some critical dimensions for layout....



















    For the mounting holes in the rear, we measured 9/16 from the edge to hole center as per original, and then made a two ended transfer punch that fit snugly between the sides. Once we had our rear measurement and the point aligned to the 9/16 scribe line, we tapped either side to mark the holes.














    Once drilled, a rod through these holes lets us locate the front bracket. We reused the bracket to save some time (and money) as it was still good and solid..









    Impaling spikes added














    All bracket installed and assembly gets media blasted to prep for powder coat.









    Robert



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