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Thread: Sacrificial Anode To Prevent Corrosion From Electrolysis In Cooling System

  1. #11
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    I'd never heard of Evans waterless coolant before Lee... but I read much of the information at the link you included. Do you use it? or have friends that use it? *wondering about the user feedback*?

    I looked for it online and found it available (full conversion kit for small block chevys) on Amazon for $299, which included 3 gallons of the Prep, and 4 gallons of the coolant.

    Most 'user feedback' I found was from racers...
    Last edited by BamaNomad; 12-06-2020 at 07:06 AM.

  2. #12
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    I guess its mostly used to keep the engine running cooler, and probably hard to justify the cost for corrosion resistance. I put it in a freshly rebuilt engine about 15 years ago, but pulled the engine out shortly after that, so I can't give you any feedback.

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    i have zero experience with it.

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    Thanks for your comments and tips, guys. Much appreciated. I will probably stay with a mix of traditional 'green' anti-freeze topped off with distilled water and install a couple of the zinc sacrificial anodes as a hedge against corrosion.

    The Evans waterless coolant sounds a bit like GM DexCool and after reading the info in the link, probably not for me.

    Son's engine will have an aluminum intake and aluminum heads though, so we will check into various other types of anti-freeze as well before making our decision on which of these to run in his car.

    Happy Motoring to all,

    Harry

  5. #15
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    I have heard that changing the antifreeze every two years prevents the Alum corrosion

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    That is something I must admit to letting slip by on our older cars, Lee. Thanks for the reminder. I have typically been a stickler for changing oil and oil filter at regular intervals. But changing engine coolant on a regular basis is something I must make a point of doing. My wife's car uses a pink coloured coolant only available from the dealer which cannot be mixed with water nor other type coolants. Its like DexCool that way. Only without the problems so long as directions are followed.

    I have thought about using this in my '57 and recommend it to my youngest son for his Camaro, as well. Dealer has no recommended periodicity for engine coolant change (which I find rather strange). Manufacturer of this engine coolant says change it every 100,000 miles or every 15 years, whichever comes first. But I am concerned about flushing contaminants out of the cooling system, so it may be better to stay with the 'green' stuff and change it every few years. Still debating which way to go on that.

    Thanks,

    Harry

  7. #17
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    Have continued researching engine coolants. Looking for a good coolant that will last a while and help prevent corrosion in son's new 350 engine with aluminum heads and intake. Finally settled on this......

    VW - Audi aluminum compatible ethylene glycol type (same as my wife's 2013 VW Passat uses). VW - Audi part number G013A8J1G (concentrate). This to be mixed with distilled water. Anywhere from 50 - 50 to 70 - 30 coolant to water ratio. Be sure to flush cooling system with water thoroughly priour to installation and do not mix with any other type of coolant. This coolant is a sort of pinkish red colour.

    Surprisingly, VW has no recommendations as to changing interval, but the coolant manufacturer recommends flushing system and changing coolant at 100,000 miles or 10 year interval, whichever is reached first. My wife's VW Passat has 138,000 miles on odometer at present. We take it to the dealer for regular maintenance and thus far, they have not changed the coolant since new. Still clean and works good as new. As added insurance, we will also install 1 or 2 of the zinc sacrificial anodes in son's 350 engine cooling system for good measure.

    Happy Motoring,

    Harry

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by enigma57 View Post
    the coolant manufacturer recommends flushing system and changing coolant at 100,000 miles or 10 year interval, whichever is reached first.
    They probably recommend flushing before you start using it also, unless the engine is new.

  9. #19
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    those anodes are not needed if you just check the level of/if any electrolosis in the system.

  10. #20
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    That's a good idea, Lee (flushing system). Even with a new or freshly rebuilt engine.

    Dave, from our experience running the VW - Audi part number G013A8J1G engine coolant in my wife's car over the past 8 years and 140,000 miles, I'd say you are right about the artificial anodes. Of course, it is formulated to run in aluminum engines and her engine and radiator are both aluminum.

    Son's engine will have dissimilar metals in contact with coolant though (cast-iron block, aluminum heads, intake and thermostat housing, copper/brass radiator). So we will likely use a couple artificial anodes as added insurance (can't hurt, might help). They aren't expensive and with a bit of thought, we may be able to position them so they can be checked when radiator cap is pulled.

    My 292 inline 6 will only have coolant in contact with cast-iron head, block and thermostat housing, though. And a copper/brass radiator. Only aluminum will be the rocker and tappet covers and intake manifold and the intake on these engines has no coolant passages. So I have more engine coolant options than with either my wife's aluminum engine or our son's 350 engine with dissimilar metals in contact with engine coolant.

    Thanks to you both for all your help. Much appreciated,

    Harry

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