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Thread: 1957 partially built Nomads being shipped from the Clevland Ohio plant straight up by train

  1. #11
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    Bama , my restorer friend Bob has my worn out copie of How to restore your 57 Chevrolet by Harold Luisiana .In the rear of this book they list the assembly plants my Memorie could be off . I live about 10 miles away from the old GM assembly plant in Tarrytown NY. My friend who started working their in 1958 told me that they were making 500 cars a shift two shifts a day . That's 1,000 cars a day . Only the Oakland California plant was making more end of the year production totals than that , and not by many cars . Ancor Motors were hauling 9 cars on a trailer out of their every three min. X-2 one trailer going North and one going South . Thier were always two trailers three min . behind them . They were moving 1,000 cars a day out of the Tarrytown NY assemble plant . These were GMC tractors with big block Chevrolet gas engines , and standard transmissions .

  2. #12
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    I think it's very well known what the list of assembly plants was.

    Big block Chevrolet gas engines did not exist in the 55-57 time frame. If the trucks were GMCs they had a six cylinder engine. W engines came out in 58, Mark IV big blocks in 65.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick_L View Post
    I think it's very well known what the list of assembly plants was.

    Big block Chevrolet gas engines did not exist in the 55-57 time frame. If the trucks were GMCs they had a six cylinder engine. W engines came out in 58, Mark IV big blocks in 65.
    I have no clue when but pretty sure is was in the 60s, when did those big GMC V-6 motors come out. GMC would have used them over a Chevy V8.

  4. #14
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    I don't know when they started, but most 60s era GMCs I've seen had one.

  5. #15
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    [QUOTE=Rick_L;63584]I don't know when they started, but most 60s era GMCs I've seen had one.[/QUOT

    GMC Truck produced a unique 60 degree V6 engine family from 1959 through 1974, in gasoline and Diesel versions. V8 and V12 derivatives of the basic design were also produced. Examples of this engine family were found in pickup trucks, Suburbans, heavier trucks and motor coaches.

    V6 big block engines were produced in 305, 351, 401 and 478 cubic-inch (5.0, 5.8, 6.6, and 7.8 respectively liter) displacements, with considerable parts commonality. During the latter years of production, 379-and-432-cubic-inch (6.2 and 7.1 L) versions with enlarged crankshaft journals were manufactured as well.

    GMC produced a 637-cubic-inch (10.4 L) 60° V8 with a single cam shaft using the same general layout (bore and stroke) as the 478 V6. The 637 V8 was the largest displacement production gasoline V8 ever made for highway trucks.

    The largest engine derived from the series was a 702-cubic-inch (11.5 L) "Twin Six" V12, which had a unique block and crankshaft, but shared many exterior parts with the 351.

    Diesel versions of the 351, 478 and 637, advertised as the ToroFlow, were also manufactured. These engines had no relationship to the well-known Detroit Diesel two-stroke engines produced by General Motors during the same time period.

    I read the above on the internet so it must be true.

  6. #16
    Registered Member busterwivell's Avatar
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    I thought GMC back in the mid-50's used the Pontiac 347 engine. I'm almost sure they did in 57.

  7. #17
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    Small-journal engines:1955-1981
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    The V8 engine was introduced for the 1955 model year as the "Strato Streak". Not long before the model year introduction, Pontiac management decided that the entire line would be V8-powered. This was based on results of over 1 million test miles, which was unheard of at the time. The 287 was an "oversquare" engine with a bore and stroke of 3+3⁄4 in × 3+1⁄4 in (95.3 mm × 82.6 mm), for a total displacement of 287.2 cu in (4.7 L). Compression ratio was a modest 8.00:1, with valve diameters of 1.781 in (45.2 mm) (intake) and 1+1⁄2 in (38 mm) (exhaust). It was rated 180 hp (134 kW) @ 4600 rpm and 264 lb⋅ft (358 N⋅m) @ 2400 rpm with a two-barrel carburetor, 200 hp (149 kW) @ 4600 rpm and 278 lb⋅ft (377 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm with the four-barrel carburetor.

    317
    For 1956 the V8 was bored out to 3.9375 in (100.01 mm), increasing displacement to 316.6 cu in (5.2 L). It was offered in the following forms:

    (with manual transmission)

    Two-barrel carburetor, 7.9:1 compression, 192 hp (143 kW) @ 4400 rpm, 297 lb⋅ft (403 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
    Four-barrel carburetor, 8.9:1 compression, 216 hp (161 kW) @ 4800 rpm, 315 lb⋅ft (427 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm
    (with Hydramatic)

    Two-barrel carburetor, 8.9:1 compression, 205 hp (153 kW) @ 4600 rpm, 294 lb⋅ft (399 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm
    Four-barrel carburetor, 8.9:1 compression, 227 hp (169 kW) @ 4800 rpm, 312 lb⋅ft (423 N⋅m) @ 3000 rpm
    Two four-barrel carburetors, 10.5:1 compression, 285 hp (213 kW) @ 5100 rpm, 330 lb⋅ft (447 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm.
    347

    Pontiac V8 engine with triple two-barrel Tri-Power carburetor setup
    For 1957 the V8's stroke was increased to 3.5625 in (90.49 mm), for a displacement of 347 cu in (5.7 L). For the first time, Pontiac offered Tri-Power, three two-barrel carburetors with a sequential linkage (replacing the previous dual-quad set-up). Power ratings increased accordingly:

    (with manual transmission)

    Two-barrel carburetor, 8.5:1 compression, 227 hp (169 kW) @ 4600 rpm, 333 lb⋅ft (451 N⋅m) @ 2300 rpm
    Four-barrel carburetor, 10:1 compression, 244 hp (182 kW) @ 4800 rpm, 350 lb⋅ft (475 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm
    (with Hydramatic)

    Two-barrel carburetor, 10.0:1 compression, 244 hp (182 kW) @ 4800 rpm, 350 lb⋅ft (475 N⋅m) @ 2600 rpm
    Four-barrel carburetor, 10.25:1 compression, 270 hp (201 kW) @ 4800 rpm, 359 lb⋅ft (487 N⋅m) @ 2900 rpm
    Three two-barrel carburetors, 10.75:1 compression, 290 hp (216 kW) @ 5000 rpm, 375 lb⋅ft (508 N⋅m) @ 2800 rpm.
    Several dealer-installed camshafts were optional to increase power further to 317 hp (236 kW). which was seen on the hood of the 1957 Daytona Grand National winning car driven by Cotton Owens.

    Standard only for the Pontiac Bonneville was Pontiac's first-ever fuel injection system. A mechanical system built by Rochester, it was similar in principle, but not identical, to the contemporary Chevrolet "fuelie". Pontiac did not release official power ratings for this engine, saying only that it had more than 300 hp (224 kW). Contemporary road tests suggest that it was actually somewhat inferior to the Tri-Power engines, although it did have better fuel economy. Only 630 Bonnevilles were produced for 1957, all of them fuel-injected.

  8. #18
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    GMC Husky 471Diesal power plant 150 hp for 28000-54000 GVW heavy trucks.

  9. #19
    Registered Member BamaNomad's Avatar
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    *wondering how this thread deviated from Nomad shipments to 'Diesel truck big block power'??? *L* Start a new thread fellas if this is something you want to discuss..

  10. #20
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    Someone brought up what powered the GMC trucks hauling those 55-57 Nomad bodies.

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